Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book

Five Great German Short Stories A Dual Language Book Five outstanding selections from noble tradition Heinrich von Kleist s The Earthquake in Chile E T A Hoffmann s The Sandman Arthur Schnitzler s Lieutenant Gustl Thomas Mann s Tristan and Franz Kaf

  • Title: Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book
  • Author: Stanley Appelbaum
  • ISBN: 9780486276199
  • Page: 137
  • Format: Paperback
  • Five outstanding selections from noble tradition Heinrich von Kleist s The Earthquake in Chile, E T A Hoffmann s The Sandman, Arthur Schnitzler s Lieutenant Gustl, Thomas Mann s Tristan, and Franz Kafka s The Judgment For each selection the editor has supplied complete literal English translations on facing pages Foreword Introduction to each story.

    • Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book : Stanley Appelbaum
      137 Stanley Appelbaum
    • thumbnail Title: Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book : Stanley Appelbaum
      Posted by:Stanley Appelbaum
      Published :2019-05-17T03:13:30+00:00

    About "Stanley Appelbaum"

    1. Stanley Appelbaum

      Stanley Appelbaum Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book book, this is one of the most wanted Stanley Appelbaum author readers around the world.

    322 thoughts on “Five Great German Short Stories: A Dual-Language Book”

    1. Story 1: Guy has bad luck, natural disaster strikes and everything turns out perfectly. Of course no 'great' story can have a happy ending, so everyone is murdered.Story 2: Guy goes bat-shit crazy. No really, absolutely nuts. It was a long time in the making. He dies.Story 3: Internal monologue of guy sitting through boring concert. While I can withstand my own internal monologue, his I couldn't handle more than a couple pages. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say he dies in some tragic, utterly r [...]


    2. Five Great German Short Stories is edited and translated by Stanley Appelbaum, who also worked on Ausgewählte Märchen. Unbeknownst to me for a while -- but it feels right. I don't know. Denser, more "normal" prose seems much harder for me to track bilingually, even just in flighty and occasionally dipped attempts; but I can tell for the most part it's solid and careful. That's what I say every time. I guess I'll just stick to verse or fancy little folk tales or airy monuments to philosophy. Y' [...]



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