The Impossibility of Sex: Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient

The Impossibility of Sex Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient The conventional view of a patient in therapy has been that of someone who forms a powerful erotic bond with the therapist On the other hand the view of the therapist has been that of a neutral list

  • Title: The Impossibility of Sex: Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient
  • Author: Susie Orbach
  • ISBN: 9780684864273
  • Page: 375
  • Format: Paperback
  • The conventional view of a patient in therapy has been that of someone who forms a powerful, erotic bond with the therapist On the other hand, the view of the therapist has been that of a neutral listener, emotionally unaffected by the patient But what really does go on within the sacrosanct space of the therapist s office Distinguished psychotherapist Susie Orbach proThe conventional view of a patient in therapy has been that of someone who forms a powerful, erotic bond with the therapist On the other hand, the view of the therapist has been that of a neutral listener, emotionally unaffected by the patient But what really does go on within the sacrosanct space of the therapist s office Distinguished psychotherapist Susie Orbach provides the answers as she presents six stories of patients, all of whom suffer from such common afflictions as depression, loneliness, compulsive eating, consuming sexual desires, and fear of attachment In each story, Orbach reveals not just the client s problems, but with startling honesty the effect the client has on her as therapist The Impossibility of Sex breaks new ground by taking us into the center of the therapy relationship, one usually shrouded by therapist client confidentiality From the unlikely role the therapist plays in the troubled relationship of two lesbians to the unsettling dreams the therapist experiences while treating a man consumed by sexual desire, Orbach illuminates the complex human interactions at the heart of the therapeutic process and the joint discoveries that contribute to its effectiveness.

    • The Impossibility of Sex: Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient BY Susie Orbach
      375 Susie Orbach
    • thumbnail Title: The Impossibility of Sex: Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient BY Susie Orbach
      Posted by:Susie Orbach
      Published :2019-06-01T20:48:45+00:00

    About "Susie Orbach"

    1. Susie Orbach

      Dr Susie Orbach the therapist who treated Diana, Princess of Wales, for her eating disorders the founder of the Women s Therapy Center of London a former columnist for The Guardian a visiting professor at the London School of Economics and the author of 1978 best seller Fat is a Feminist Issue is, aside from Sigmund Freud, probably the most famous psychotherapist to have ever set up couch in Britain.

    946 thoughts on “The Impossibility of Sex: Stories of the Intimate Relationship between Therapist and Patient”

    1. I've heard of Susie Orbach for years, and when reading Jeanette Winterson's recent memoir (they are partners), my interest was further piqued. This book was (1) an interesting sojourn into the kinds of problems people bring to therapy situations, (2) an incredibly savvy treatment of those problems, and both (3a) a window into the both the transformative possibility of conversation AND (3b) the ways in which therapists are challenged and changed within the therapeutic encounter. I am a lifelong s [...]


    2. I found this book a little hard-going; it is heavy on psychoanalytic theory and interpretation. As a counsellor taught primarily using the person-centred model, I've held a lot of prejudice against psychoanalysis - it can be reductivist, directive, it can miss the client's experience in a determination to force them to fit the model, rather than vice-versa. There is also a lot of intellectual content in an analysis; I had to concentrate, re-reading paragraphs, rather than reading casually.That s [...]


    3. I can't believe I didn't complete my "date read" or add this book to my "read" shelf! I received a prompt in the recent newsletter and fully recognize that it is because I don't have the words to sufficiently express how much this book did for/meant to me, an aspiring therapist. I felt so uncomfortable with the palpable sexuality described between therapist and client in the first chapter that I didn't think I'd finish the book (tells you something about me, hey?). However, I learned depths abou [...]


    4. This book gave me loads of food for thought. I don't subscribe to the psychodynamic theory like Susie, but there was a good deal that seemed to hit home with me in terms of her reflection and assessment. Reading the insights of Susie as she sits with her clients, how she questions herself at time and allows the clients to take the long road on their own others, is almost like a play by play for a therapy session. I thoroughly enjoyed the stories of the clients, and feel like I'm learning at the [...]


    5. Author of Sex is a Feminist Issue, Susie Orbach, gives readers a glimpse of what happens when a psychotherapist closes the door behind her and a client. It is fiction, but answers a few burning questions. Unfortunately, as the title implies, sex is an issue. Orbach makes the point at the end of the book that even Freud, for all his famed research into sexual fantasies, didn’t understand “the erotic”. Simultaneously, she views sex as a metaphor for communication, which language is in and of [...]


    6. I'm not in a position to evaluate the theory the author is working from, though some of it strikes me as baseless or heterosexist. The text reads well, especially at the start of the book.Should this be shelved as fiction since all the case studies are made up? If so, it's only engaging fiction up to the last case study. The last, titular case study is the most theoretical, and it's followed by two chapters of discussion that seem part theoretical review, part author's extremely indulgent afterw [...]


    7. An unusual book that may be best described as a 'fictional memoir'. I picked it up for the author (Dr Orbach) and figured that the content she wrote would be interesting by default.Not the case - only about half of it was interesting. Each chapters details a different character that presents for therapy, and I found their stories mostly interesting. At some point in each chapter, however, my interest would wane and I would find myself struggling to complete the chapter.If I was more interested i [...]


    8. Spoiler alert: these stories are just so, fiction. While Orbach writes elegantly and intelligently the patients and their interactions with her projected self are merely products of her vast imagination. It would be an interesting professional exercise to produce fictional clients and work through their concerns solely in ones mind, a working role play. Still, I can't help but feel a bit cheated.


    9. Interesting stories. I was disappointed at the end of the book to discover they aren't actually based on real clients, but are complete fiction. Kinda took the magic away. I felt a little deceived. But an enjoyable read.




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