The Permanent Tax Revolt: How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics

The Permanent Tax Revolt How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics Tax cuts are such a pervasive feature of the American political landscape that the political establishment rarely questions them Since Congress has abolished the tax on inherited wealth and pass

  • Title: The Permanent Tax Revolt: How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics
  • Author: Isaac William Martin
  • ISBN: 9780804758710
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tax cuts are such a pervasive feature of the American political landscape that the political establishment rarely questions them Since 2001, Congress has abolished the tax on inherited wealth and passed a major income tax cut every year, including two of the three largest income tax cuts in American history despite a long drawn out war and massive budget deficits The PerTax cuts are such a pervasive feature of the American political landscape that the political establishment rarely questions them Since 2001, Congress has abolished the tax on inherited wealth and passed a major income tax cut every year, including two of the three largest income tax cuts in American history despite a long drawn out war and massive budget deficits The Permanent Tax Revolt traces the origins of this anti tax campaign to the 1970s, in particular, to the influence of grassroots tax rebellions as homeowners across the United States rallied to protest their local property taxes.Isaac William Martin advances the provocative new argument that the property tax revolt was not a conservative backlash against big government, but instead a defensive movement for government protection from the market The tax privilege that the tax rebels were defending was in fact one of the largest government social programs in the postwar era.While the movement to defend homeowners tax breaks drew much of its inspiration and many of its early leaders from the progressive movement for welfare rights, politicians on both sides of the aisle quickly learned that supporting big tax cuts was good politics In time, American political institutions and the strategic choices made by the protesters ultimately channeled the movement toward the kind of tax relief favored by the political right, with dramatic consequences for American politics today.

    • The Permanent Tax Revolt: How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics By Isaac William Martin
      144 Isaac William Martin
    • thumbnail Title: The Permanent Tax Revolt: How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics By Isaac William Martin
      Posted by:Isaac William Martin
      Published :2019-06-01T11:00:48+00:00

    About "Isaac William Martin"

    1. Isaac William Martin

      Isaac William Martin is Professor of Sociology at the University of California San Diego.

    884 thoughts on “The Permanent Tax Revolt: How the Property Tax Transformed American Politics”


    1. The book tackles two questions: (1) Why was there a tax revolt against property taxes in the latter half of the 20th Century in the US and Britain?, and (2) Why did the tax revolt "turn right" and continue as an ongoing talking point in America?Professor Martin's structure in addressing those questions could be quite a bit better. He jumps between those two questions until he feels like he has fully resolve the second one and can then focus on the first.A quick paraphrase of his answers are:(1) [...]


    2. A skillfully rendered short account of the American property tax revolt of the 70s that turned tax cutting (as opposed to budget balancing) into the third rail of modern Republican politics. Martin uses quantitative and comparative evidence to demonstrate how attempts to modernize tax assessments by eliminating informal tax privileges can cause widespread social discord. A compelling read, even if some of the author's conclusions seem a bit too neat.


    3. I'm going to plunge back into this and slog through it from time to time when I not reading something fictional that's easierI think it's important to understand how California and the country got so politically messed up over the issue of taxes, because as the child of old-school liberals, I just don't get it.


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