The Compleat Traveller in Black

The Compleat Traveller in Black This is a collection of stories of the Traveller in Black It is set in a world where chaos rules One man the man with many names but one nature is charged with creating order out of the warring force

  • Title: The Compleat Traveller in Black
  • Author: John Brunner Martin Springett
  • ISBN: 9780312940607
  • Page: 287
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is a collection of stories of the Traveller in Black It is set in a world where chaos rules One man the man with many names, but one nature is charged with creating order out of the warring forces of nature.Contents Imprint of Chaos 1960 Break the Door of Hell 1966 The Wager Lost by Winning 1970 The Things That Are Gods 1979 Dread Empire 1971

    • The Compleat Traveller in Black « John Brunner Martin Springett
      287 John Brunner Martin Springett
    • thumbnail Title: The Compleat Traveller in Black « John Brunner Martin Springett
      Posted by:John Brunner Martin Springett
      Published :2019-06-24T10:58:38+00:00

    About "John Brunner Martin Springett"

    1. John Brunner Martin Springett

      John Brunner was born in Preston Crowmarsh, near Wallingford in Oxfordshire, and went to school at St Andrew s Prep School, Pangbourne, then to Cheltenham College He wrote his first novel, Galactic Storm, at 17, and published it under the pen name Gill Hunt, but he did not start writing full time until 1958 He served as an officer in the Royal Air Force from 1953 to 1955, and married Marjorie Rosamond Sauer on 12 July 1958At the beginning of his writing career Brunner wrote conventional space opera pulp science fiction Brunner later began to experiment with the novel form His 1968 novel Stand on Zanzibar exploits the fragmented organizational style John Dos Passos invented for his USA trilogy, but updates it in terms of the theory of media popularised by Marshall McLuhan The Jagged Orbit 1969 is set in a United States dominated by weapons proliferation and interracial violence, and has 100 numbered chapters varying in length from a single syllable to several pages in length The Sheep Look Up 1972 depicts ecological catastrophe in America Brunner is credited with coining the term worm and predicting the emergence of computer viruses in his 1975 novel The Shockwave Rider , in which he used the term to describe software which reproduces itself across a computer network Together with Stand on Zanzibar , these novels have been called the Club of Rome Quartet , named after the Club of Rome whose 1972 report The Limits to Growth warned of the dire effects of overpopulation.Brunner s pen names include K H Brunner, Gill Hunt, John Loxmith, Trevor Staines, Ellis Quick, Henry Crosstrees Jr and Keith Woodcott.In addition to his fiction, Brunner wrote poetry and many unpaid articles in a variety of publications, particularly fanzines, but also 13 letters to the New Scientist and an article about the educational relevance of science fiction in Physics Education Brunner was an active member of the organisation Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and wrote the words to The H Bomb s Thunder , which was sung on the Aldermaston Marches.Brunner had an uneasy relationship with British new wave writers, who often considered him too American in his settings and themes He attempted to shift to a mainstream readership in the early 1980s, without success Before his death, most of his books had fallen out of print Brunner accused publishers of a conspiracy against him, although he was difficult to deal with his wife had handled his publishing relations before she died 2 Brunner s health began to decline in the 1980s and worsened with the death of his wife in 1986 He remarried, to Li Yi Tan, on 27 September 1991 He died of a heart attack in Glasgow on 25 August 1995, while attending the World Science Fiction Convention thereakaK H Brunner, Henry Crosstrees Jr, Gill Hunt with Dennis Hughes and E C Tubb , John Loxmith, Trevor Staines, Keith WoodcottWinner of the ESFS Awards in 1980 as Best Author and 1n 1984 as Novelist

    694 thoughts on “The Compleat Traveller in Black”

    1. "As you wish. So be it." The traveller in black utters these words countless times on his journeys.The Traveller in Black is the agent of the One Who, a man with many names but one nature, tasked with making order from chaos, primarily by granting people's wishes in a literal sense. He gives a god to a nation without one; he unites a girl with her lost love by making her join him as a slave.The writing is definitely denser than I thought it would be, reminding me of Gene Wolfe at times and Micha [...]


    2. This one kind of threw me, since the writing can be dense and hard to follow. I was expecting something a bit more pulpy. That said, The Traveller in Black is serious, highbrow fantasy. Literature. In some ways, with its archaic language and rich descriptions, The Traveller in Black resembles Jack Vance's Dying Earth tales, though it's not as fun, as it gets increasingly serious as the traveller makes his stops along the way. In fact, these stories (a series of novellas) can be quite horrific, w [...]


    3. The stories in this volume deal with a nameless protagonist, who "has many names but only one nature" and who bears a staff of curdled light, held together by interesting forces, travelling through a landscape in which Order and Chaos are in conflict. With this, and the powers invested in him by "the One for whom all things are neither possible or impossible", he is enabled to counter Chaos, although he must do so in answer to the spoken wishes of the people around him, always with consequences [...]


    4. Originally published on my blog here in July 2001.The five tales in this collection, which as it says is the complete set of stories about the traveller in black, were written over about a twenty year period and were revised for inclusion in this volume. The stories all have the same plot, each describing a tour made by the traveller around the cities in his domain, reducing chaos and promoting law; he makes this journey whenever a particular configuration of stars is seen in the sky. He is desc [...]


    5. review of John Brunner's The Traveler in Black by tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE - May 20, 2014 I have a paper bag full of John Brunner bks on the floor of my bedroom, where I do most of my reading. When I need a break from whatever more challenging bks I'm reading (it's been William Gaddis's The Recognitions + others for quite some time now) I dip into the bag & pull one out. Two dips ago I pulled out Now Then, a collection of 3 novellas that include his earliest published story + a bit called [...]



    6. Although I've read some of Brunner's SF, I had not heard of this book until I started playing the White Wolf RPG game Exalted. That book lists The Compleat Traveller in Black as an inspiration, and so, even though it is out of print, I was inspired to eventually find a copy of this book and read it.It feels very much like some of Moorcock's Melnibonean work. The world is young, and still in many ways in the grip of the elder era of Chaos. The laws of science, logic and reason are still not in fu [...]


    7. I came across this book recently on my 'books I've read' pile, but I couldn't remember anything about it so decided to give it a re-read. It didn't take too long before I realised I had never read this book before. There is absolutely no way I would ever have forgotten the Traveller, the man with many names but only one nature. And there is no way I would ever have forgotten the phrase, "as you wish, so be it". I am so glad I found this little gem of a book, and rescued it from mis-shelving. Thi [...]


    8. Found this one in one of my local bookstore for just a buck!! I have been looking for a copy for years and I couldn't leave it behind, lol. The premise and artwork on the cover drew me in, even though I am unfamiliar with the author. The stories begin strong, but my interest waned with the Traveler's redundancy. "As you wish, so be it." Simplistic, but profound with the power those words convey. Aside from this I really enjoyed it and thought that it read a lot like Gene Wolfe. I recommend it.


    9. Somehow I expected a bit more of this one. It was enjoyable, yes, and the setting was something not seen too often (King later used a similar setting for his Dark Tower series), but all in all it was a bit too flowery in its' prose and too skimpy on actual plot. Well, technically it is a collection of short stories, although the way they are presented makes them appear more like an actual novel. There is a sense of continuity between different stories. One element from one story will for sure ap [...]


    10. My! My! John Brunner is yet another majestic wordsmith that I will have to start becoming much more familiar with; especially on the strength of these extraordinarily cogent, erudite, and downright philosophical parables, about the errant nature of man, and the Traveler in Black's witty, trans-formative adventures within a land beset with misfortune and magical malfeasance. These are beautifully written tales, whereby the enigmatic titular character, in his own inimitable way, strives, unambiguo [...]


    11. The traveller in black has many names but a single nature, and carries a staff of curdled light. Whenever four planets are in a certain conjunction he is bound to walk the lands on the borders of order and chaos. The task that has been entrusted to him is to working towards banishing chaos, so that the cities of the borderlands can move from the land of chaos and eternity into the real world of order and time. As well as being able to bind elementals and limit their powers, one of the other ways [...]


    12. A nameless traveler with great powers is tasked with removing magic from the world. He does this by granting wishes which inevitably backfire by destroying the remaining vestiges of wonder and magic. At the start the Traveler laughs at the people whose foolish wishes he grants, but by the end he is deeply melancholy about the loss of magic in the world. These stories are drawn from various stages of Brunner's career and they reflect his evolution as a writer. He was clearly drawn to return to th [...]


    13. Inventive. Provoking. I like this fellow of many names and the consequences of his one nature as portrayed within this book. These consequences and scenarios allow for some reflection and my thoughts wandered a number of times. I haven't jumped into a book with enchanters and riddles in a long while and it took a few chapters for me to transition, but, I was soon riding along the prose and was captivated by it. It's refreshingly non-reliant on Tolkien mythology.


    14. The Brunner variations on a theme of order and chaos. The Traveller in Black is a force of order in a chaotic world of men, gods and demi-gods. Brunner is inventive in his vignettes of man's foibles and we are often led to conclude: "be careful what you wish for."


    15. This was a book that blew me away when I first read it as a young man. It took sci-fi/fantasy somewhere I hadn't seen before. A real eye-opener, and exquisitely written. About time I re-read it


    16. I absolutely adore the stories in this setting I have read; these are probably the ones that got me started on loving fantasy fiction, in fact. I want to get my hands on this book!!



    17. Wonderful collection of 5 fantasy stories quite unlike the usual stuff. The Traveler wanders the world gradually converting chaos to reason by granting wishes unknown to the wisher. Dense and literate but compelling writing. I don't know how I missed this one in my heavy fantasy reading days other than Brunner was not generally a fantasy writer. Not for the lover of elves and faery, but a terrific book if you're willing to try something a bit different.



    18. Raccolta di 5 racconti brevi dove vengono narrate le vicende del viandante. Opera ben fatta e personaggio molto originale ma scritta in un linguaggio un po’ prosaico.


    19. Recommended by James Stoddard, my favorite living author, John Brunner’s The Compleat Traveller in Black is a Fantasy short-story collection. In broad terms, these five tales are about the adventures of the title character: an enigmatic little man who wears a black cloak and wields a staff made of light, a man who is tasked by an even more enigmatic master to travel the world and battle against the forces of magic and chaos, all in order to usher in an era of stability and reason. How does he [...]


    20. This is a 'jesus the genii' type story where a guywith a staff walks around Vance's Dying Earth type world andrestores it's form from chaos. It's got some fine momentsin it, it really pales to Dying Earth, or Vance'sfollow up to DE, RHIALTO THE MARVELOUS. The writingstyle in here too is pretty subtle, maybe I was halfasleep and moody when I read most of it around 3-6 am. Ijust couldn't tell all the time if people were beingkilled off unless I reread some certain parts. Hiswordage was a little to [...]


    21. This is, without question, the most pungent, steaming pile of dreck I've ever tried to read. I haven't seen self-impressed tripe like this since I waded through "The Darkness that Comes Before". I'm tempted to keep reading it, just to marvel at the sheer jarring spectacle of it all. This might be the worst thing I've read from a major author - and I've read Terry Goodkind! Normally I would suggest avoiding this like the plague but I may simply recommend it if you're intrigued by literary shipwre [...]


    22. Very reminiscent of Moorcock, in both the ongoing Law / Chaos struggle fundamental to the universe, and in the very matter-of-fact tone of writing about strange and bizarre things. (I'm not aware of the timelines enough to know if one influenced the other, or if they both came out of a similar background). Quite fun, and good in small chunks, but nothing spectacular.


    23. A series of interconnected tales about a being of many names, but a single nature. A little bit of fantasy meets a little bit of the Twilight Zone as the Traveller in Black, with his staff of congealed light, grants desires wherever he goes. But as the adage goes, be careful what you wish for.


    24. Wow, I haven’t read Traveler in Black since 1970 when I purchased the book. Boy, is it a product of the era of the pulp magazines. It’s four major chapters originally having been published as short stories or novellas. Of all the people, getting this update, I whole-heartedly recommend it.


    25. There's an unexplained mythology in these stories that I find strangely compelling, but it's been thirty years since I read them, so I really can't say more.



    26. One-dimensional characterization coupled with a one-dimensional take on the cliched order vs. chaos dichotomy. A simplistic take on what could be--and should be--a complex interplay of ideas.


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