Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult

Secret Agent Aleister Crowley British Intelligence and the Occult Aleister Crowley is best known today as a founding father of modern occultism His wide hypnotic eyes peer at us from the cover of The Beatles Sgt Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band and his influence c

  • Title: Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult
  • Author: Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley
  • ISBN: 9781932595338
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Paperback
  • Aleister Crowley is best known today as a founding father of modern occultism His wide, hypnotic eyes peer at us from the cover of The Beatles Sgt Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and his influence can be found everywhere in popular culture.Crowley, also known as the Great Beast, has been the subject of several biographies, some painting him as a misunderstood genius,Aleister Crowley is best known today as a founding father of modern occultism His wide, hypnotic eyes peer at us from the cover of The Beatles Sgt Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and his influence can be found everywhere in popular culture.Crowley, also known as the Great Beast, has been the subject of several biographies, some painting him as a misunderstood genius, others as a manipulative charlatan None of them have looked seriously at his career as an agent of British Intelligence.Using documents gleaned from British, American, French, and Italian archives, Secret Agent 666 sensationally reveals that Crowley played a major role in the sinking of the Lusitania, a plot to overthrow the government of Spain, the thwarting of Irish and Indian nationalist conspiracies, and the 1941 flight of Rudolf Hess.Author Richard B Spence argues that Crowley in his own unconventional way was a patriotic Englishman who endured years of public vilification in part to mask his role as a secret agent.The verification of the Great Beast s participation in the twentieth century s most astounding government plots will likely blow the minds of history buff s and occult aficionados alike.Author Richard B Spence can be seen on various documentaries on the History Channel and is a consultant for Washington, DC s International Spy Museum He is also the author of Trust No One The Secret World of Sidney Reilly Feral House.

    • Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult : Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley
      247 Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley
    • thumbnail Title: Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult : Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley
      Posted by:Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley
      Published :2019-06-07T08:50:06+00:00

    About "Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley"

    1. Richard B. Spence Aleister Crowley

      Dr Richard Rick Spence received his PhD in History from the University of California Santa Barbara in 1981 He has taught at the University of Idaho since 1986 where currently he is a tenured full Professor of History He specializes in Russian, intelligence and military history, and his course offerings include Modern Espionage, Anti Semitism and the Holocaust, History of Secret Societies and the Occult in History.Dr Spence s published works include Boris Savinkov Renegade on the Left East European Monographs Columbia Univ Press, 1991 , Trust No One The Secret World of Sidney Reilly Feral House, 2002 and Secret Agent 666 Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult Feral House, 2008 He is also the author of numerous articles in Revolutionary Russia, Intelligence and National Security, International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, The Historian, New Dawn and other publications He has served as a commentator consultant for the History Channel and the International Spy Museum and was a key consultant interviewee for the Russian Cultural Foundation s 2007 documentary film, Leon Trotsky The Secret of World Revolution, and its subsequent Trap for the Tsar.

    884 thoughts on “Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult”

    1. In Lobster, the premier journal of para-politics in the UK, I argued that more latitude should be given to historians when dealing with the shadowy world of espionage. I had an interest as someone initially trained as a historian, who had participated in a range of political projects and who often had had to deal with cases of political manipulation damaging the reputation of persons who were clients or friends of mine.The 'truth' about the grey world between official record and unrecorded actio [...]


    2. Any history of espionage relies on circumstance and reads gaps in the historical record as much as as it considers documents. This trait is doubled here, where the murky and obscure worlds of ritual magicians, con men, and occultists intersect in dizzying tangles of fact and conjecture. A few likelihoods emerge -- Crowley probably did act as a kind of agent provocateur during World War I, writing increasingly crazed propaganda for pro-German factions in the USA in the service of the British secr [...]


    3. Just what was self-proclaimed Antichrist Aleister Crowley doing in America during World War I? Did he instigate the attack on the Lusitania as a provocateur? What, if, anything, did he have to do with the interrogation of Rudolf Hess? Readers looking for answers are likely to be disappointed by this book, where what is advertised is not what is offered. The blurbs give no idea of how much of it is SPECULATION. The book is peppered with "could have", "possible", "would not be surprising" . as wel [...]


    4. First off, the bad - there are way too many people to keep track of, and no 'Dramatis Personæ' to aid one in sorting them out when one forgets who is who. Thus, a star was deducted.This is not a biography of To Mega Therion, but instead uses his life to support its central thesis - that Crowley was a British secret agent. While the documentation is lacking (naturally), absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, and its absence, given how notorious Crowley was, is certainly something to be [...]


    5. Why this one is worth looking at - according to official description "Crowley, also known as the Great Beast, has been the subject of several biographies, some painting him as a misunderstood genius, others as a manipulative charlatan. None of them have looked seriously at his career as an agent of British Intelligence. Using documents gleaned from British, American, French, and Italian archives, Secret Agent 666 sensationally reveals that Crowley played a major role in the sinking of the Lusita [...]


    6. A very thoroughly researched and documented look at the previously little-known "spy" work 666 did throughout his life, especially during WWI. Until reading this book, I had always simply taken 666's word for it that his motives for writing in The Fatherland, etc were what he said they were. Now, I understand that this was not only plausible but probably the case, and then some. A very enjoyable and informative study for anyone who wants to look more closely at what has previously been a sort of [...]


    7. Aleister Crowley is on the cover of the Sgt. Pepper album, he is referenced in music by Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath. He was an occultist, poet and performance artist. His live rituals open to the public featured naked women, live music and psychedelic mushrooms. But what no one knew until recently, was that he was actually a master spy for British Intelligence! One of the most amazing spy stories you will ever read!


    8. though it is dense with facts, half truths, rumours and hearsay it only serves to add to the mystic and mystery that surrounds Crowley. Found it a very slow read but really enjoyed the connections and links it raised. Very enjoyable for someone with an interest in AC.


    9. This is a great 50 pages of fascinating info, padded out with another 250 of extremely tenuous speculation. I did enjoy it all the same, but basically not really worth it unless you are a Crowley fanatic.


    10. Informative and intriguing. Whilst it answered some questions, it left just as many un-answered. More names than I could cope with leisurely, but fascinating none the less. Highly recommend.


    11. Well-researched but not well-written. This book is not engaging at all and I have to force myself to read another chapter or two a day.



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